The Paradox of Asemic Writing

In my first post on asemic writing, I ended by pointing to the paradoxical nature of this art form: the marks involved are at once meaningless (since they have no semantic meaning) and meaningful (since, as an art form, there can be meaning behind their creation – the intention, emotion, or state of mind expressed…

View Post

Pseudographia: Automatic Asemic Writing

Pseudographia is the term I use to refer to either the practice of automatic asemic writing, that is, wordless, artistic writing created in an unconscious way, or the unconscious drive to engage in such writing. I have recently been revisiting the work of the Belgian poet and artist Henri Michaux, as I feel his asemic…

View Post

Infinite Cityscapes: Hyper-Detailed Architectural Drawings by Benjamin Sack

Benjamin Sack is an American artist who is noted for creating hyper-detailed drawings of cityscapes that mingle realism with abstraction. He depicts infinite cities, architectural labyrinths of dizzying detail. When I first came across his work, I was incredibly impressed (mindblown, to be honest) to see how he represented both the infinite and the infinitesimal…

View Post

The Value and Impact of Controversial Art

In many areas of life, controversy can carry negative connotations. When something is controversial, you might assume the worst, thinking that it must involve an opinion or action that is hateful, prejudicial, dangerous, or deplorable in some way. In art, controversy is a very different thing. There is a long history of artists and artistic…

View Post

Xenoglyphs and Asemic Writing: The Joy of Creating Alien Symbols

For several years, I have found myself drawn to the practice of asemic writing (artistic, meaningless writing, which has the appearance of a genuine language). However, I didn’t know there was a specific term for the practice – or that it belonged to an artistic trend – until quite recently. When drawing, or just mindlessly…

View Post