Antinatalism and the Consent Argument

Antinatalism is the view that it is morally wrong to bring new people into existence (although a more universal sense of antinatalism includes all sentient beings, not just humans). The common arguments used to defend antinatalism include the position that existence is an overall harm, negative utilitarian arguments (which posit that minimising suffering takes priority…

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The Ethics of Cheating a Drug Test

In many different contexts, you will be required to take a drug test – testing for specific drugs, legal or illegal – and testing positive for any of the prohibited substances will result in some form of non-entry (non-entry into a job, a sporting competition, or a scientific study), or a ban (e.g. being banned…

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What Are the Essential Features of Ethical Advertising?

Advertising is one of those industries that is strongly associated with unethical or dodgy practices, preying on people’s emotions and insecurities to get them to spend money on things they don’t need, on things that are irrelevant to genuine happiness. Researchers from the University of Warwick have also drawn a link between advertising spending in…

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The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula K. Le Guin: An Analogy for Antinatalism

The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas is a philosophical short story by the sci-fi writer Ursula K. Le Guin, originally published in 1973 and then re-republished in The Wind’s Twelve Quarters (1975), a collection of Le Guin’s short stories. This particular short story (which you can read here) describes the utopian city of Omelas,…

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On Antinatalism and Depression

Antinatalism is the view that procreation is morally wrong. Its most well-known current defender is David Benatar, a professor of philosophy at the University of Capetown, who explicated this moral position on procreation in his 2006 book Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence. However, antinatalism long predates Benatar’s work. Antinatalism has…

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